2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109337
Title:
Blood cell generation from the hemangioblast.
Authors:
Lancrin, Christophe; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Serrano, Alicia G; Gandillet, Arnaud; Ferreras, Cristina; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges
Abstract:
Understanding how blood cells are generated is important from a biological perspective but also has potential implications in the treatment of blood diseases. Such knowledge could potentially lead to defining new conditions to amplify hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or could translate into new methods to produce HSCs, or other types of blood cells, from human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. Additionally, as most key transcription factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding their function during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of blood development from the earliest hematopoietic precursor, the hemangioblast, a precursor for both endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK, Stem Cell Biology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK.
Citation:
Blood cell generation from the hemangioblast. 2010, 88 (2):167-72 J. Mol. Med.
Journal:
Journal of Molecular Medicine
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109337
DOI:
10.1007/s00109-009-0554-0
PubMed ID:
19856139
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1432-1440
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLancrin, Christopheen
dc.contributor.authorSroczynska, Patrycjaen
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, Alicia Gen
dc.contributor.authorGandillet, Arnauden
dc.contributor.authorFerreras, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.authorKouskoff, Valerieen
dc.contributor.authorLacaud, Georgesen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-09T15:33:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-09T15:33:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationBlood cell generation from the hemangioblast. 2010, 88 (2):167-72 J. Mol. Med.en
dc.identifier.issn1432-1440-
dc.identifier.pmid19856139-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00109-009-0554-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109337-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding how blood cells are generated is important from a biological perspective but also has potential implications in the treatment of blood diseases. Such knowledge could potentially lead to defining new conditions to amplify hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or could translate into new methods to produce HSCs, or other types of blood cells, from human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. Additionally, as most key transcription factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding their function during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of blood development from the earliest hematopoietic precursor, the hemangioblast, a precursor for both endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHaemangioblastsen
dc.subjectHaematopoiesisen
dc.subjectLeukaemiaen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBlood Cells-
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation-
dc.subject.meshCell Lineage-
dc.subject.meshHemangioblasts-
dc.subject.meshHematopoiesis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLeukemia-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshTranscription Factors-
dc.titleBlood cell generation from the hemangioblast.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK, Stem Cell Biology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Molecular Medicineen

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