Lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (2): a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with leisure-time physical activity.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109235
Title:
Lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (2): a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with leisure-time physical activity.
Authors:
Harriss, D J; Atkinson, G; Batterham, A; George, K; Cable, N Tim; Reilly, Thomas; Haboubi, Najib; Renehan, Andrew G ( 0000-0003-4309-4396 )
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Increased physical activity may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. As a prerequisite to the determination of lifestyle attributable risks, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies to quantify gender-specific risk associated with increased leisure-time physical activity (LT-PA). METHOD: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (to December 2007), and other sources, selecting reports based on strict inclusion criteria. We used random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for uppermost vs lowermost categories of physical activity. To investigate dose-response, we explored risks ratios as a function of cumulative percentiles of physical activity distribution. RESULTS: Fifteen datasets from 14 articles, including 7873 incident cases, were identified. For colon cancer, there were inverse associations with LT-PA for men (RR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96) and women (0.86; 0.76-0.98). LT-PA did not influence risk of rectal cancer. The dose-response analysis was consistent with linear pattern reductions in risk of colon cancer in both genders. There was evidence of moderate between-study heterogeneity but summary estimates were broadly consistent across potential confounding factors. CONCLUSION: Increased LT-PA is associated with a modest reduction in colon but not rectal cancer risk; a risk reduction, which previously may have been overstated. LT-PA only interventions in public health cancer prevention strategies are unlikely to impact substantially on colorectal cancer incidences.
Affiliation:
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
Citation:
Lifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (2): a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with leisure-time physical activity. 2009, 11 (7):689-701 Colorectal Dis
Journal:
Colorectal Disease
Issue Date:
Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109235
DOI:
10.1111/j.1463-1318.2009.01767.x
PubMed ID:
19207713
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1463-1318
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Surgery

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarriss, D Jen
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Gen
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Ken
dc.contributor.authorCable, N Timen
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorHaboubi, Najiben
dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew Gen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-07T10:44:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-07T10:44:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-
dc.identifier.citationLifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (2): a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with leisure-time physical activity. 2009, 11 (7):689-701 Colorectal Disen
dc.identifier.issn1463-1318-
dc.identifier.pmid19207713-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1463-1318.2009.01767.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109235-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Increased physical activity may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. As a prerequisite to the determination of lifestyle attributable risks, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies to quantify gender-specific risk associated with increased leisure-time physical activity (LT-PA). METHOD: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (to December 2007), and other sources, selecting reports based on strict inclusion criteria. We used random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for uppermost vs lowermost categories of physical activity. To investigate dose-response, we explored risks ratios as a function of cumulative percentiles of physical activity distribution. RESULTS: Fifteen datasets from 14 articles, including 7873 incident cases, were identified. For colon cancer, there were inverse associations with LT-PA for men (RR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.96) and women (0.86; 0.76-0.98). LT-PA did not influence risk of rectal cancer. The dose-response analysis was consistent with linear pattern reductions in risk of colon cancer in both genders. There was evidence of moderate between-study heterogeneity but summary estimates were broadly consistent across potential confounding factors. CONCLUSION: Increased LT-PA is associated with a modest reduction in colon but not rectal cancer risk; a risk reduction, which previously may have been overstated. LT-PA only interventions in public health cancer prevention strategies are unlikely to impact substantially on colorectal cancer incidences.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectColonic Canceren
dc.subjectRectal Canceren
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLeisure Activities-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio-
dc.subject.meshRectal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshRisk Reduction Behavior-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.titleLifestyle factors and colorectal cancer risk (2): a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations with leisure-time physical activity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentResearch Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalColorectal Diseaseen

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