2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/108787
Title:
Laboratory and epidemiologic studies of fecapentaenes.
Authors:
Povey, Andrew C; Schiffman, M; Taffe, B G; Harris, C C
Abstract:
Fecapentaenes are a class of conjugated ether lipids which have been identified as the major component of human fecal mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella mutagenesis assay. Human epidemiologic data have indicated that most healthy North American populations eating a western diet do excrete detectable levels of fecapentaenes. Excreted fecapentaene levels seem to reflect levels throughout the colonic lumen, and levels vary characteristically between individuals. Those individuals found to excrete high levels of fecapentaene appear, based on limited data, to be at decreased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice have been predominantly negative, however, increased tumor incidence in mice exposed to fecapentaenes as neonates has recently been reported. Fecapentaenes are direct-acting genotoxins, which may react with DNA through free radical mechanisms, and/or aldehyde formation. Mechanisms by which fecapentaene-induced DNA damage may mediate carcinogenesis are discussed.
Affiliation:
Carcinogenesis Department, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, Great Britain.
Citation:
Laboratory and epidemiologic studies of fecapentaenes.259 (3-4):387-97 Mutat Res.
Journal:
Mutation Research
Issue Date:
1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/108787
PubMed ID:
2017218
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0027-5107
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPovey, Andrew Cen
dc.contributor.authorSchiffman, Men
dc.contributor.authorTaffe, B Gen
dc.contributor.authorHarris, C Cen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-02T10:34:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-02T10:34:10Z-
dc.date.issued1991-
dc.identifier.citationLaboratory and epidemiologic studies of fecapentaenes.259 (3-4):387-97 Mutat Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0027-5107-
dc.identifier.pmid2017218-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/108787-
dc.description.abstractFecapentaenes are a class of conjugated ether lipids which have been identified as the major component of human fecal mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella mutagenesis assay. Human epidemiologic data have indicated that most healthy North American populations eating a western diet do excrete detectable levels of fecapentaenes. Excreted fecapentaene levels seem to reflect levels throughout the colonic lumen, and levels vary characteristically between individuals. Those individuals found to excrete high levels of fecapentaene appear, based on limited data, to be at decreased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Carcinogenicity studies in rats and mice have been predominantly negative, however, increased tumor incidence in mice exposed to fecapentaenes as neonates has recently been reported. Fecapentaenes are direct-acting genotoxins, which may react with DNA through free radical mechanisms, and/or aldehyde formation. Mechanisms by which fecapentaene-induced DNA damage may mediate carcinogenesis are discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methods-
dc.subject.meshEthers-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMutagens-
dc.subject.meshPolyenes-
dc.titleLaboratory and epidemiologic studies of fecapentaenes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCarcinogenesis Department, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, Great Britain.en
dc.identifier.journalMutation Researchen

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