2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/107533
Title:
Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.
Authors:
Lorigan, Paul C ( 0000-0002-8875-2164 ) ; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne ( 0000-0001-5617-9781 ) ; Howell, Anthony ( 0000-0002-6233-719X ) ; Thatcher, Nick
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer. 2010:Lancet Oncol
Journal:
The Lancet Oncology
Issue Date:
9-Jun-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/107533
DOI:
10.1016/S1470-2045(10)70056-5
PubMed ID:
20541465
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1474-5488
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Medical Oncology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLorigan, Paul Cen
dc.contributor.authorCalifano, Raffaeleen
dc.contributor.authorFaivre-Finn, Corinneen
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nicken
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T08:33:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T08:33:54Z-
dc.date.issued2010-06-09-
dc.identifier.citationLung cancer after treatment for breast cancer. 2010:Lancet Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1474-5488-
dc.identifier.pmid20541465-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1470-2045(10)70056-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/107533-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.titleLung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Lancet Oncologyen

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