The feasibility of using glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase the planned dose intensity of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (ACE) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/107468
Title:
The feasibility of using glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase the planned dose intensity of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (ACE) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.
Authors:
Thatcher, Nick; Anderson, Heather; Bleehen, N M; Girling, D J; Lallemand, G; Machin, D; Stephens, R J
Abstract:
This study was conducted to test the feasibility of reducing the interval between cycles of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide (ACE) chemotherapy to 2 weeks, thereby increasing dose intensity, by adding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to reduce the duration of neutropenia following a cycle. 20 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were prescribed six cycles of 2-weekly ACE, with G-CSF on the intermediate days. 3 patients died during the treatment period and a further 5 had ACE terminated, 3 for toxicity and 2 for progressive disease. Of the 71 intervals between cycles, 42 (59%) were of the prescribed 14 days, 9 (13%) of 15-20 days, 15 (21%) of 21 days and five (7%) longer, but during the first four cycles, 36 (77%) of 47 intervals were of 14 days. The main reason for delay was haematological toxicity. All 20 patients experienced WHO grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, but at 2 weeks after a cycle only 3 had grade 4 and 1 grade 3. 17 patients required blood transfusion and 12 platelet transfusion. The only potentially serious adverse reaction to G-CSF was an episode of rash with facial oedema. Adding G-CSF allows ACE chemotherapy to be intensified by reducing the interval between cycles.
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Oncology, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester.
Citation:
The feasibility of using glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase the planned dose intensity of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (ACE) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party. 1995, 31A (2):152-6 Eur J Cancer
Journal:
European Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/107468
PubMed ID:
7536433
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0959-8049
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nicken
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Heatheren
dc.contributor.authorBleehen, N Men
dc.contributor.authorGirling, D Jen
dc.contributor.authorLallemand, Gen
dc.contributor.authorMachin, Den
dc.contributor.authorStephens, R Jen
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-12T15:01:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-12T15:01:37Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.citationThe feasibility of using glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase the planned dose intensity of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (ACE) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party. 1995, 31A (2):152-6 Eur J Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0959-8049-
dc.identifier.pmid7536433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/107468-
dc.description.abstractThis study was conducted to test the feasibility of reducing the interval between cycles of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide (ACE) chemotherapy to 2 weeks, thereby increasing dose intensity, by adding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to reduce the duration of neutropenia following a cycle. 20 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were prescribed six cycles of 2-weekly ACE, with G-CSF on the intermediate days. 3 patients died during the treatment period and a further 5 had ACE terminated, 3 for toxicity and 2 for progressive disease. Of the 71 intervals between cycles, 42 (59%) were of the prescribed 14 days, 9 (13%) of 15-20 days, 15 (21%) of 21 days and five (7%) longer, but during the first four cycles, 36 (77%) of 47 intervals were of 14 days. The main reason for delay was haematological toxicity. All 20 patients experienced WHO grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, but at 2 weeks after a cycle only 3 had grade 4 and 1 grade 3. 17 patients required blood transfusion and 12 platelet transfusion. The only potentially serious adverse reaction to G-CSF was an episode of rash with facial oedema. Adding G-CSF allows ACE chemotherapy to be intensified by reducing the interval between cycles.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Small Cell-
dc.subject.meshCyclophosphamide-
dc.subject.meshDoxorubicin-
dc.subject.meshEtoposide-
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeutropenia-
dc.subject.meshPalliative Care-
dc.subject.meshThrombocytopenia-
dc.titleThe feasibility of using glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase the planned dose intensity of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (ACE) in the treatment of small cell lung cancer. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Canceren

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