The lower radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells irradiated in vivo than in vitro: a cell contact effect phenomenon.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/104715
Title:
The lower radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells irradiated in vivo than in vitro: a cell contact effect phenomenon.
Authors:
Jen, Yee-Min; West, Catharine M L; Hendry, Jolyon H
Abstract:
For mouse kidney cells assayed in primary culture, the Do and n values were 1.1 +/- 0.06 Gy and 7 +/- 2 for single cells irradiated in vitro, and 1.3 +/- 0.08 Gy and 25 +/- 11 for in vivo irradiation. The lower radiosensitivity in vivo was shown not to be caused by natural hypoxia, as the average oxygen enhancement ratios were 2.6 +/- 0.3 for in vitro and 2.8 +/- 0.4 for in vivo irradiation. Irradiations of fragments of kidney tubules produced similar survivals as irradiations of kidneys in situ, even for irradiation immediately before the fragments were disaggregated into single cells. The critical point of change in radiosensitivity from in vivo to in vitro values due to this contact effect was the time that the kidney cells were monodispersed.
Affiliation:
Department of Radiobiology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, U.K.
Citation:
The lower radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells irradiated in vivo than in vitro: a cell contact effect phenomenon. 1991, 20 (6):1243-8 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
Journal:
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Issue Date:
Jun-1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/104715
PubMed ID:
2045299
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0360-3016
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJen, Yee-Minen
dc.contributor.authorWest, Catharine M Len
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon Hen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-11T11:47:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-11T11:47:47Z-
dc.date.issued1991-06-
dc.identifier.citationThe lower radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells irradiated in vivo than in vitro: a cell contact effect phenomenon. 1991, 20 (6):1243-8 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016-
dc.identifier.pmid2045299-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/104715-
dc.description.abstractFor mouse kidney cells assayed in primary culture, the Do and n values were 1.1 +/- 0.06 Gy and 7 +/- 2 for single cells irradiated in vitro, and 1.3 +/- 0.08 Gy and 25 +/- 11 for in vivo irradiation. The lower radiosensitivity in vivo was shown not to be caused by natural hypoxia, as the average oxygen enhancement ratios were 2.6 +/- 0.3 for in vitro and 2.8 +/- 0.4 for in vivo irradiation. Irradiations of fragments of kidney tubules produced similar survivals as irradiations of kidneys in situ, even for irradiation immediately before the fragments were disaggregated into single cells. The critical point of change in radiosensitivity from in vivo to in vitro values due to this contact effect was the time that the kidney cells were monodispersed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCell Communication-
dc.subject.meshCell Survival-
dc.subject.meshKidney-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Tolerance-
dc.titleThe lower radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells irradiated in vivo than in vitro: a cell contact effect phenomenon.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiobiology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, U.K.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physicsen
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