2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/104668
Title:
Wholesomeness and safety of irradiated foods.
Authors:
Swallow, A John
Abstract:
Irradiation with gamma-rays, X-rays or fast electrons can be used to change foodstuffs in beneficial ways or to destroy harmful organisms. Gamma rays do not induce radioactivity in foods, but X-rays and fast electrons can induce short lived radioactivity if sufficiently energetic. This imposes limitations on the energies which can be used, and a short wait between irradiation and consumption may be advisable. Irradiation produces chemical changes in foodstuffs, and some foods are unsuitable for irradiation. With appropriate foods, trials with animals and human volunteers generally show that the product is safe. Some loss in nutritional quality can take place, which could be significant for some individuals, but are unlikely to be important for those on a balanced diet. Irradiation does not eliminate all risk from microbial contamination. Foods to be irradiated should be good quality, and need to be kept under proper conditions after irradiation. Irradiated foods should be appropriately labelled. Tests for radiation would help to enforce necessary controls. If the process is properly carried out on appropriate foods, and all due precautions are taken, irradiated foods are wholesome and safe.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research Campaign Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Patterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital & Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, England.
Citation:
Wholesomeness and safety of irradiated foods. 1991, 289:11-31 Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
Journal:
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Issue Date:
1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/104668
PubMed ID:
1897386
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0065-2598
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSwallow, A Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-11T10:07:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-11T10:07:05Z-
dc.date.issued1991-
dc.identifier.citationWholesomeness and safety of irradiated foods. 1991, 289:11-31 Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0065-2598-
dc.identifier.pmid1897386-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/104668-
dc.description.abstractIrradiation with gamma-rays, X-rays or fast electrons can be used to change foodstuffs in beneficial ways or to destroy harmful organisms. Gamma rays do not induce radioactivity in foods, but X-rays and fast electrons can induce short lived radioactivity if sufficiently energetic. This imposes limitations on the energies which can be used, and a short wait between irradiation and consumption may be advisable. Irradiation produces chemical changes in foodstuffs, and some foods are unsuitable for irradiation. With appropriate foods, trials with animals and human volunteers generally show that the product is safe. Some loss in nutritional quality can take place, which could be significant for some individuals, but are unlikely to be important for those on a balanced diet. Irradiation does not eliminate all risk from microbial contamination. Foods to be irradiated should be good quality, and need to be kept under proper conditions after irradiation. Irradiated foods should be appropriately labelled. Tests for radiation would help to enforce necessary controls. If the process is properly carried out on appropriate foods, and all due precautions are taken, irradiated foods are wholesome and safe.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshElectrons-
dc.subject.meshFood Irradiation-
dc.subject.meshFood Microbiology-
dc.subject.meshFree Radicals-
dc.subject.meshGamma Rays-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNutritive Value-
dc.titleWholesomeness and safety of irradiated foods.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Patterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital & Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, England.en
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biologyen
All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.